Tag: f/

27 Nov

A fairy’s light source – a critique for @PeteGlogiewicz

Chris Lane / Critique, photography / / 0 Comments

Pete (on twitter here) recently sent me a photo for critique in a project style that he has never done before. Here is the photo:

Pete's original photo

Issues in the metadata

Here is the metadata from the image: 255Kb (in the original that he posted on his website), shot on a Canon 400D/XTi with an EF28-80mm f/3.5-5.6 USM lens. It was shot at ISO 200, f/11 and 1/80th of a second. The focal length was 28mm.

In the metadata I can see a couple things generally wrong with this. First, the size of his file. This is minor, but I know for an image that is only 900px wide, he should be able to compress that file down a lot more without any issues. If he is using Photoshop, he should be using the Save for Web function instead of the Save As function. The file sizes will be dramatically smaller. This isn’t an issue with the photo itself of course, but in the scheme of things it is important. If he wants his website found, Google does use page load speed as one of it’s parameters for search results.

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26 Oct

Camera Basic – Shutter Speed

Chris Lane / Camera parts, photography / / 2 Comments

The shutter is what really makes a camera. In essence a camera is just a box that holds some film or a sensor with a hole in the end that opens and closes to let in light. This is evident from as far back as the camera obscura which helped artists essentially trace a picture of a person to resemble their likeness. Similar to that is the pin-hole camera, where a piece of film or printing paper is placed inside a camera and literally a pin-hole is punched in the other end which can be uncovered to take some surprisingly phenomenal photographs. Only slightly more complex from this is a typical 35mm camera. This can introduce aperture, which is actually dependent on the lens. It also gives the ability to adjust mechanically the time the shutter is open. The size of the opening through the lens dramatically decreases the amount of time that the shutter need be open in comparison to pin-hole cameras. Then with DSLRs (Digital Single Lens Reflex) cameras, the only thing that is really changed is instead of the shutter opening to a silver halide film plane, it opens to a light sensor of some kind. Today the typical is the CMOS sensor, which is beyond the scope of this post to explain.

Shutter speed generally adjusts from 1/8000 of a second to as long as you want it open,
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18 Nov

Critique – Sarah S.

Chris Lane / Critique, photography, Retouched / / 3 Comments
I have learned through both college and work experience that one of the best ways to learn anything is through critiques of your work and other’s work. That is why, in the spirit of teaching through this blog, I am happy to critique the work of submissions from readers. If you would like a professional critique from me and learn how to better your artwork, be it photo, design, painting, et al, just read these submission guidelines and submit an image through my critique contact form. You can also email your submission to photocrit [at] chrislanephoto.com.

Photo from Sarah S. Prairie Smoke

Today I have a photo from Sarah S. She said she took this photo of Prairie Smoke (aka Old Man’s Whiskers or if you are really hardcore Plantae Tracheobionta Spermatophyta Magnoliophyta Magnoliopsida Rosidae Rosales Rosaceae Geum L. Geum triflorum Pursh) in the North Dakota Badlands handheld in a shady ravine. Looking at the metadata, it was taken with a Canon PowerShot S3 IS at f/2.7 at 1/60.

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18 Oct

You must experiment!

Chris Lane / Art, Design, photography / / 0 Comments

Failure to experiment leads to craft shows and chintzy work.

The whole process of creating art is completely subjective and open to interpretation at all bounds. I want to urge everyone to not be afraid to experiment in their work. Artwork can be created by the numbers, but most viewers will be able to tell it is done in a formulaic way. It won’t stand out amongst the crowd. I recently attended a local arts & craft show and I couldn’t count how many people were selling mostly the same stuff. If it wasn’t rock bracelets, it was plywood cutout figures. They might be good at what they do when making those figures, but they weren’t willing to experiment. All of them looked the same, to the point I was wondering if they weren’t homemade but rather being resold from elsewhere. That means that they were either being made from a pattern or the entire genre has simply become stagnant.

The thing about experimentation is that no one has to know. Photography, for example, is great for experimentation. It is so easy to try something new, especially with digital cameras. Try getting lower, to the point of laying in the grass, and get a shot from a worm’s eye view.
Grass closeup

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